State Supreme Court Rules Portions Of Pennsylvania’s Megan’s Law Unconstitutional

December 17, 2013
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The Pennsylvania Supreme Court on Monday ruled portions of the state’s Megan’s Law regarding the registration of sex offenders unconstitutional.

At the same time, the high court “stayed” their ruling for three months to allow state lawmakers to correct the problem they have found.

The court ruled that the revised Megan’s Law included other legislation that violates a stipulation that a state law be confined to a single subject.  Justices explained that the legislation also included measures regarding real estate law, the jurisdiction of park police and a statute of limitations on legal action involving asbestos cases.

The ruling is one of several in recent months that references the single-subject law, which actually has been on the books for about 150 years.

Megan’s Law had been revised in 2004 to include notification requirements for out-of-state offenders who move into Pennsylvania, the establishment of community notification standards, and the creation of an online database for offenders.  It also added institutional sexual assault and luring to the list of crimes that require a ten-year registration, and set new penalties for offenders who do not register.

 

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